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Salt games attract a crowd in Myrtle Beach

Salt games attract a crowd in Myrtle Beach

WCBD-TV: News, Weather, and Sports for Charleston, SC

From our News Partner at WCBD-TV:The first Native Sons salt games took place Sunday in Myrtle Beach. It took place from 9am to 11pm.

People competed in various sporting events at the beach. One of those events was the Surf City paddleboard race.

"Paddleboard race was nice. The wind kicked up just before we went out and made it pretty tough. Now the conditions are a lot better. But it was tough for people out there today," said Mark Allison, owner of Surf City Surf Shop.

There were also games for kids. At 11am there was the Ripley's Aquarium kids' shark run. There was also a contest called the Sea Salt Margarita challenge which asked participants to use their hair to collect as much water from the ocean as possible.

But it wasn't just about the games. Organizers said part of the money raised will go to an organization called Surfrider that helps to keep the beaches clean.

"Surfrider foundation is an international non-profit dedicated to keeping our oceans, waves and waterways clean. We educate, promote cleanliness and do beach sweeps," said Bruxanne Hein, a volunteer for the Grand Strand chapter.

On the surfrider foundation website it said plastics kill 1.5 million marine animals each year. They also said it's dangerous for our health and costs millions to clean up.

"In order for us to enjoy them [the beaches], and for future generations to enjoy them, as well as the quality of marine life, if we don't keep our oceans clean then we don't have fish to eat or any of the things we like to do in the water," said Hein.

Hein said the solution is for everyone to pick up their trash at the beach and to also pick up a few extra things.

The surfrider organization said paper litter can last 2-4 weeks. Cigarette butts can last 1-5 years. And aluminum cans can last at least 80 years. All of that they said has a negative impact on our environment.

Image and video courtesy of WCBD-TV.

 

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